[vc_row tlg_padding=”pb0″][vc_column width=”2/3″][tlg_headings title_tag=”h2″ alignment=”left” spacing=”mb16″ title=”What Is The Winter Solstice/Hibernal Solstice?”][vc_column_text]Winter solstice, also called hibernal solstice, the two moments during the year when the path of the Sun in the sky is farthest south in the Northern Hemisphere (December 21 or 22) and farthest north in the Southern Hemisphere (June 20 or 21). 

At the winter solstice the Sun travels the shortest path through the sky, and that day therefore has the least daylight and the longest night.[/vc_column_text][tlg_spacer height=”20″ height_tablet=”20″ height_mobile=”10″][vc_single_image image=”5270″ img_size=”large”][tlg_spacer height=”20″ height_tablet=”20″ height_mobile=”10″][vc_column_text]When the winter solstice happens in the Northern Hemisphere, the North Pole is tilted about 23.4° (23°27′) away from the Sun. Because the Sun’s rays are shifted southward from the Equator by the same amount, the vertical noon rays are directly overhead at the Tropic of Capricorn (23°27′ S). Six months later the South Pole is inclined about 23.4° away from the Sun. 

On this day of the winter solstice in the Southern Hemisphere, the Sun’s vertical overhead rays progress to their northernmost position, the Tropic of Cancer (23°27′ N).

According to the astronomical definition of the seasons, the winter solstice also marks the beginning of the season of winter, which lasts until the vernal equinox (March 20 or 21 in the Northern Hemisphere, or September 22 or 23 in the Southern Hemisphere). After the solstice, the days get longer, and the day has thus been celebrated in many cultures as a time of rebirth.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_widget_sidebar sidebar_id=”page”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][/vc_column][/vc_row]